Robert II "Le Pieux" CAPET King of the Franks
(972-1031)
Constance Taillefer DE TOULOUSE Queen of France
(Abt 986-1032)
Yaroslav I "Mudriy"(the Wise) RURIK Grandduke of Kiev
(978-1054)
Ingrid (Ingegerda) OLAFSDÓTTIR Princess of Sweden
(Abt 1001-1050)
Henri I CAPET King of the Franks
(1008-1060)
Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna RURIK Grand Duchess of Kiev
(1036-1076)
Hugues "Le Maisné" CAPET Duc de Vermandois & Bourgogne
(1053-1101)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Ctse Adélaïs DE VERMANDOIS

Hugues "Le Maisné" CAPET Duc de Vermandois & Bourgogne

  • Born: 1053, Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
  • Married: 1067, France
  • Died: 18 Oct 1101, Tarsus, , Cilicie
  • Buried: Cathedral of St. Paul de Tarse, Turkey

   Another name for Hugues was Cte Hugues I "le Grand" DE VERMANDOIS.

   General Notes:

Hugh DE CRÉPI (styled "the Great"), COUNT OF VERMANDOIS (younger son of HENRY I, KING OF FRANCE), m. Adelaide, daughter and heir of Herbert, COUNT OF VERMANDOIS and VALOIS. [Complete Peerage]

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Marquis Orleans, Count Amiens, Paris, Valois, & Vermandois

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Leo van de Pas' data base has Hugh d. 1102, but Chris Phillips seems to have the better source, which he gives below in response to a request from Leo, on SGM, 22 Jan 2004:

From: Chris Phillips (cgp AT medievalgenealogy.org.uk)
Subject: Re: When DID he die?
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2004-01-22 00:38:39 PST

Runciman on that page, in a chapter on "The Crusades of 1101", describes the Battle of Heraclea, early September 1101, and says this of Hugh: "Hugh of Vermandois was badly wounded in the battle; but some of his men rescued him and he too reached Tarsus. But he was a dying man. His death took place on 18 October and they buried him there in the Cathedral of St Paul. He never fulfilled his vow to go to Jerusalem."

Runciman's sources for this section are "Albert of Aix, VIII, 34-40, pp. 579-82 (the only full source); Ekkehard, XXIV-XXVI, pp. 30-2". If you'd like to follow this to source, both these are available on the gallica website, in the "Recueil des historiens des croisades series" - put these numbers into the "Recherche libre" field on the search page: N051574 for Albert; N051575 for Ekkehard.

Chris Phillips

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The following post from Nathaniel Taylor, 22 Jan 2004, gives the story behind the battle which caused Hugh's death:

Well, it was I who first first posted the death date & circumstances on Hugh of Vermandois when I started this whole messy thread. But the 1101 date is clearly correct, because Hugh died of wounds after the battle in which a Crusader force was annihilated at Heraklea (Asia Minor) in late September of 1101. There is no mistaking the year, in the chronology of the first Crusade's aftermath. Runciman (2:28-29) does not provide a precise date for that battle, but it was one of three major failures of Western forces the Summer and Fall of 1101. See generally his _History of the Crusades_, vol. 2, chapter 2, "The Crusades of 1101." On the battle at Heraklea, he says:

"Early in September they [see below] entered Heraclea, which they found deserted as Konya had been. Just beyond the town flowed the river, one of the few Anatolian streams to flow abundantly throughout the summer. The Christian warriors, half-mad from thirst, broke their ranks to rush to the welcoming water. But the Turkish army lay concealed in the thickets on the river banks. As the crusaders surged on in disorder, the Turks sprang out on them and surrounded them. There was no time to reform ranks. Panic spread through the Christian army. Horsemen and infantry were mixed in a dreadful stampede; and as they stumbled in their attempt to flee they were slaughtered by the enemy. The duke of Aquitaine, followed by one of his grooms, cut his way out and rode into the mountains. After many days of wandering through the passes he found his way to Tarsus. Hugh of Vermandois was badly wounded in the battle; but some of his men rescued him and he too reached Tarsus. But he was a dying man. His death took place on 18 October and they buried him there in the Cathedral of St Paul. He never fulfilled his vow to go to Jerusalem. Welf of Bavaria only escaped by throwing away all his armer. After several weeks he arrived with two or three attendants at Antioch. Archbishop Thiemo [of Salzburg] was taken prisoner and martyred for his faith. The fate of the Margravine of Austria is unknown. Later legends said that she ended her days ia captive in a far-off harem, where she gave birth to the Moslem hero Zengi. More probably she was thrown from her litter in the panic and trampled to death."

Runciman cites Albert of Aachen, 8.34-40 (pp. 579-82 in the edition he cites); and Ekkehard, 24-26 (pp. 30-32), among other material on the legend of the the Margravine of Austria, etc.

Nat Taylor

   Marriage Information:

Hugues married Ctse Adélaïs DE VERMANDOIS, daughter of Comte Herbert IV DE VERMANDOIS and Adelle DE VERMANDOIS de Vexin, in 1067 in France. (Ctse Adélaïs DE VERMANDOIS was born about 1065 in Valois, Bretagne, France and died on 23 Sep 1120 in Vermandois, Aisne, Picardy, France.)


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